Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic

Publication Title: 
Journal of Traumatic Stress

Although there is an abundance of novel interventions for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), often their efficacy remains unknown. This systematic review assessed the evidence for 15 new or novel interventions for the treatment of PTSD. Studies that investigated changes to PTSD symptoms following the delivery of any 1 of the 15 interventions of interest were identified through systematic literature searches. There were 19 studies that met the inclusion criteria for this study.

Author(s): 
Metcalf, Olivia
Varker, Tracey
Forbes, David
Phelps, Andrea
Dell, Lisa
DiBattista, Ashley
Ralph, Naomi
O'Donnell, Meaghan
Publication Title: 
Journal of Investigative Medicine: The Official Publication of the American Federation for Clinical Research

BACKGROUND: Mind-body practices are increasingly used to provide stress reduction for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Mind-body practice encompasses activities with the intent to use the mind to impact physical functioning and improve health. METHODS: This is a literature review using PubMed, PsycINFO, and Published International Literature on Traumatic Stress to identify the effects of mind-body intervention modalities, such as yoga, tai chi, qigong, mindfulness-based stress reduction, meditation, and deep breathing, as interventions for PTSD.

Author(s): 
Kim, Sang Hwan
Schneider, Suzanne M.
Kravitz, Len
Mermier, Christine
Burge, Mark R.
Publication Title: 
Psychiatry Research

People with PTSD experience high levels of cardiovascular disease and comorbid mental health problems. Physical activity (PA) is an effective intervention in the general population. We conducted the first systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the effect of PA on PTSD. We searched major electronic databases from inception till 03/2015 for RCTs of PA interventions among people with PTSD. A random effects meta-analysis calculating hedges g was conducted. From a potential of 812 hits, four unique RCTs met the inclusion criteria (n=200, mean age of participants 34-52 years).

Author(s): 
Rosenbaum, Simon
Vancampfort, Davy
Steel, Zachary
Newby, Jill
Ward, Philip B.
Stubbs, Brendon
Publication Title: 
Journal of Physical Activity & Health

BACKGROUND: This study describes evidence of yoga's effectiveness for depressive disorders, general anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder (PD), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in adults. We also address adverse events associated with yoga. METHODS: We searched multiple electronic databases for systematic reviews (SRs) published between 2008 and July 2014, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) not identified in eligible SRs, and ongoing RCTs registered with ClincalTrials.gov. RESULTS: We identified 1 SR on depression, 1 for adverse events, and 3 addressing multiple conditions.

Author(s): 
Duan-Porter, Wei
Coeytaux, Remy R.
McDuffie, Jennifer R.
Goode, Adam P.
Sharma, Poonam
Mennella, Hillary
Nagi, Avishek
Williams, John W.
Publication Title: 
Rhode Island Medical Journal (2013)

There is increasing interest in the use of yoga as way to manage or treat depression and anxiety. Yoga is afford- able, appealing, and accessible for many people, and there are plausible cognitive/affective and biologic mechanisms by which yoga could have a positive impact on depression and anxiety. There is indeed preliminary evidence that yoga may be helpful for these problems, and there are several ongoing larger-scale randomized clinical trials. The current evidence base is strongest for yoga as efficacious in reducing symptoms of unipolar depression.

Author(s): 
Uebelacker, Lisa A.
Broughton, Monica K.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Traumatic Stress

Although there is an abundance of novel interventions for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), often their efficacy remains unknown. This systematic review assessed the evidence for 15 new or novel interventions for the treatment of PTSD. Studies that investigated changes to PTSD symptoms following the delivery of any 1 of the 15 interventions of interest were identified through systematic literature searches. There were 19 studies that met the inclusion criteria for this study.

Author(s): 
Metcalf, Olivia
Varker, Tracey
Forbes, David
Phelps, Andrea
Dell, Lisa
DiBattista, Ashley
Ralph, Naomi
O'Donnell, Meaghan
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: Vipassana meditation (VM) is one of the most ancient and diffused types of meditative practices belonging to the pole of mindfulness. Despite the growing interest toward the neurobiological and clinical correlates of many meditative practices, no review has specifically focused on current evidence on neuro-imaging and clinical evidence about VM. METHODS: A literature search was undertaken using MEDLINE,((R)) ISI web of knowledge, the Cochrane database, and references of retrieved articles.

Author(s): 
Chiesa, Alberto
Publication Title: 
Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice and Policy

OBJECTIVE: Interest in meditation to manage posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms is increasing. Few studies have examined the effectiveness of meditation programs offered to Veterans within Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) mental health services. The current study addresses this gap using data from a multisite VA demonstration project. METHOD: Evaluation data collected at 6 VA sites (N = 391 Veterans) before and after a meditation program, and a treatment-as-usual (TAU) program, were examined here using random effects meta-analyses.

Author(s): 
Heffner, Kathi L.
Crean, Hugh F.
Kemp, Jan E.
Publication Title: 
AAOHN journal: official journal of the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses

Mindfulness meditation (MfM) is a mind-body therapy identified by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Initially taught in a formal classroom setting, MfM is a sustainable intervention with minimal costs that can be used over time. For veterans, after mastery, this technique shows promise in improving health outcomes and quality of life. This article describes MfM, discusses the conceptual framework and evidence-based research for MfM, and identifies the implications of MfM use by health care providers who are caring for war veterans.

Author(s): 
Cuellar, Norma G.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Investigative Medicine: The Official Publication of the American Federation for Clinical Research

BACKGROUND: Mind-body practices are increasingly used to provide stress reduction for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Mind-body practice encompasses activities with the intent to use the mind to impact physical functioning and improve health. METHODS: This is a literature review using PubMed, PsycINFO, and Published International Literature on Traumatic Stress to identify the effects of mind-body intervention modalities, such as yoga, tai chi, qigong, mindfulness-based stress reduction, meditation, and deep breathing, as interventions for PTSD.

Author(s): 
Kim, Sang Hwan
Schneider, Suzanne M.
Kravitz, Len
Mermier, Christine
Burge, Mark R.

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