Stress, Psychological

Publication Title: 
CA: a cancer journal for clinicians

Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Patients with breast cancer commonly use complementary and integrative therapies as supportive care during cancer treatment and to manage treatment-related side effects. However, evidence supporting the use of such therapies in the oncology setting is limited.

Author(s): 
Greenlee, Heather
DuPont-Reyes, Melissa J.
Balneaves, Lynda G.
Carlson, Linda E.
Cohen, Misha R.
Deng, Gary
Johnson, Jillian A.
Mumber, Matthew
Seely, Dugald
Zick, Suzanna M.
Boyce, Lindsay M.
Tripathy, Debu
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death and disability in the industrialized world, and its prevalence is rapidly increasing among developing nations. The increasing global prevalence of CVD reflects in part the concurrent rise in insulin resistance, obesity, dyslipidemia, and other atherogenic changes associated with insulin resistance syndrome (IRS). Evidence suggests that chronic stress and related psychosocial factors also play an important role in the development and progression of IRS-related states and ultimately, in the pathogenesis of CVD.

Author(s): 
Innes, Kim E.
Vincent, Heather K.
Taylor, Ann Gill
Publication Title: 
Journal of obstetric, gynecologic, and neonatal nursing: JOGNN

OBJECTIVE: To examine published evidence on the effectiveness of mind-body interventions during pregnancy on perceived stress, mood, and perinatal outcomes. DATA SOURCES: Computerized searches of PubMed, Cinahl, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library. STUDY SELECTION: Twelve out of 64 published intervention studies between 1980 and February 2007 of healthy, adult pregnant women met criteria for review. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Studies were categorized by type of mind-body modality used. Progressive muscle relaxation was the most common intervention.

Author(s): 
Beddoe, Amy E.
Lee, Kathryn A.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Stress is considered an important precipitating factor for seizures. Yoga is believed to induce relaxation and stress reduction. The effect of yoga on the EEG and the autonomic nervous system have been reported. Yoga would be an attractive therapeutic option for epilepsy (if proved effective), in view of its nonpharmacological nature, minimal side effects and international acceptance. OBJECTIVES: To assess the efficacy of yoga in the treatment of patients with epilepsy.

Author(s): 
Ramaratnam, S.
Sridharan, K.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Stress is considered an important precipitating factor for seizures. Yoga is believed to induce relaxation and stress reduction. The effect of yoga on the EEG and the autonomic nervous system have been reported. Yoga would be an attractive therapeutic option for epilepsy (if proved effective), in view of its nonpharmacological nature, minimal side effects and international acceptance. OBJECTIVES: To assess the efficacy of yoga in the treatment of patients with epilepsy.

Author(s): 
Ramaratnam, S.
Sridharan, K.
Publication Title: 
Pediatrics

Mind-body therapies are popular and are ranked among the top 10 complementary and integrative medicine practices reportedly used by adults and children in the 2007-2012 National Health Interview Survey. A growing body of evidence supports the effectiveness and safety of mind-body therapies in pediatrics. This clinical report outlines popular mind-body therapies for children and youth and examines the best-available evidence for a variety of mind-body therapies and practices, including biofeedback, clinical hypnosis, guided imagery, meditation, and yoga.

Author(s): 
SECTION ON INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE
Publication Title: 
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing

Although yoga has been practiced in Eastern culture for thousands of years as part of life philosophy, classes in the United States only recently have been offered to people with cancer. The word yoga is derived from the Sanskrit root yuj, meaning to bind, join, and yoke. This reflection of the union of the body, mind, and spirit is what differentiates yoga from general exercise programs. Yoga classes in the United States generally consist of asanas (postures), which are designed to exercise every muscle, nerve, and gland in the body.

Author(s): 
DiStasio, Susan A.
Publication Title: 
Current Oncology Reports

Being diagnosed with a life-threatening disease such as cancer and undergoing treatment can cause unwanted distress and interferes with quality of life. Uncontrolled stress can have a negative effect on a number of biological systems and processes leading to negative health outcomes. While some distress is normal, it is not benign and must be addressed, as failure to do so may compromise health and QOL outcomes. We present the evidence for the role of stress in cancer biology and mechanisms demonstrating how distress is associated with worse clinical outcomes.

Author(s): 
Chaoul, Alejandro
Milbury, Kathrin
Sood, Anil K.
Prinsloo, Sarah
Cohen, Lorenzo
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of yoga on psychologic function and quality of life (QoL) in women with breast cancer. DESIGN: A systematic search of PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, and the Chinese Digital Journals Full-text Database was carried out. Randomized control trials (RCTs) examining the effects of yoga, versus a control group receiving no intervention, on psychologic functioning and QoL in women with breast cancer were included.

Author(s): 
Zhang, Jun
Yang, Ke-hu
Tian, Jin-hui
Wang, Chun-Mei
Publication Title: 
Journal of Evidence-Based Complementary & Alternative Medicine

Stress is a global public health problem with several negative health consequences, including anxiety, depression, cardiovascular disease, and suicide. Mindfulness-based stress reduction offers an effective way of reducing stress by combining mindfulness meditation and yoga in an 8-week training program. The purpose of this study was to look at studies from January 2009 to January 2014 and examine whether mindfulness-based stress reduction is a potentially viable method for managing stress.

Author(s): 
Sharma, Manoj
Rush, Sarah E.

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