Young Adult

Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

INTRODUCTION: Little is known about the adoption of evidence-based practice (EBP) by yoga therapists (YTs). OBJECTIVE: To determine the attitudes, skills, training, use, barriers and facilitators to the use of EBP amongst North American YTs DESIGN: Cross-sectional, descriptive survey METHODS: Self-identified YTs practicing in North America were invited to participate in an online survey. YT attitudes, skills, training, utilisation, barriers to use, and facilitators of EBP use were measured using the 84-item Evidence-Based practice Attitude and utilization SurvEy (EBASE).

Author(s): 
Sullivan, Marlysa
Leach, Matthew
Snow, James
Moonaz, Steffany
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: To introduce research that presents scientific evidence regarding the effects of mantra and mindfulness meditation techniques and yoga on decreasing blood pressure (BP) in patients who have hypertension.

Author(s): 
Park, Seong-Hi
Han, Kuem Sun
Publication Title: 
Journal of Sports Sciences

Our understanding of the relationship between physical activity and health is constantly evolving. Therefore, the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences convened a panel of experts to review the literature and produce guidelines that health professionals might use. In the ABC of Physical Activity for Health, A is for All healthy adults, B is for Beginners, and C is for Conditioned individuals.

Author(s): 
O'Donovan, Gary
Blazevich, Anthony J.
Boreham, Colin
Cooper, Ashley R.
Crank, Helen
Ekelund, Ulf
Fox, Kenneth R.
Gately, Paul
Giles-Corti, Billie
Gill, Jason M. R.
Hamer, Mark
McDermott, Ian
Murphy, Marie
Mutrie, Nanette
Reilly, John J.
Saxton, John M.
Stamatakis, Emmanuel
Publication Title: 
Brain, Behavior, and Immunity

Physical activity (PA) is emerging as a safe and effective tool in the prevention and treatment of psychiatric disorders. PA subtypes include aerobic, resistance, flexibility, neuromotor (involving balance, agility and co-ordination), mind-body (e.g. tai chi, qi gong and yoga) and mixed type trainings. Evidence from clinical trials suggests that PA subtypes can have positive clinical effects, however the effects on the symptomatology may vary according to the PA subtype.

Author(s): 
Eyre, Harris A.
Baune, Bernhard T.
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of an integrative medicine approach to the management of asthma compared to standard clinical care on quality of life (QOL) and clinical outcomes. METHODS: This was a prospective parallel group repeated measurement randomized design. Participants were adults aged 18 to 80 years with asthma. The intervention consisted of six group sessions on the use of nutritional manipulation, yoga techniques, and journaling. Participants also received nutritional supplements: fish oil, vitamin C, and a standardized hops extract.

Author(s): 
Kligler, Benjamin
Homel, Peter
Blank, Arthur E.
Kenney, Jeanne
Levenson, Hanniel
Merrell, Woodson
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To summarize and evaluate evidence for the effect of yoga on menstrual disorders. METHODS: PubMed, CINAHL/MEDLINE, Web of Science, AMED, and Scopus were searched for English-language literature relevant to the review question. All primary research studies were included. RESULTS: Fifteen studies described in 18 papers were included in the review. A range of yoga interventions were used. Some studies used a combination of Asana, Pranayama, and other yogic relaxation or meditation techniques.

Author(s): 
Oates, Jennifer
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice

A systematic review revealed three small randomised controlled trials of yoga for low back pain, all of which showed effects on back pain that favoured the yoga group. To build on these studies a larger trial, with longer term follow-up, and a number of different yoga teachers delivering the intervention is required. This study protocol describes the details of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of Yoga for chronic Low Back Pain, which is funded by Arthritis Research Campaign (arc) and is being conducted by the University of York.

Author(s): 
Cox, Helen
Tilbrook, Helen
Aplin, John
Chuang, Ling-Hsiang
Hewitt, Catherine
Jayakody, Shalmini
Semlyen, Anna
Soares, Marta O.
Torgerson, David
Trewhela, Alison
Watt, Ian
Worthy, Gill
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: A growing number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have investigated the therapeutic value of yoga interventions. This bibliometric analysis aimed to provide a comprehensive review of the characteristics of the totality of available randomized yoga trials. METHODS: All RCTs of yoga were eligible. Medline/PubMed, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, IndMED, and the tables of content of yoga specialty journals not listed in medical databases were screened through February 2014. Bibliometric data, data on participants, and intervention were extracted and analyzed descriptively.

Author(s): 
Cramer, Holger
Lauche, Romy
Dobos, Gustav
Publication Title: 
Journal of Physiotherapy

QUESTION: In women with primary dysmenorrhoea, what is the effect of physiotherapeutic interventions compared to control (either no treatment or placebo/sham) on pain and quality of life? DESIGN: Systematic review of randomised trials with meta-analysis. PARTICIPANTS: Women with primary dysmenorrhea. INTERVENTION: Any form of physiotherapy treatment. OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was menstrual pain intensity and the secondary outcome was quality of life. RESULTS: The search yielded 222 citations. Of these, 11 were eligible randomised trials and were included in the review.

Author(s): 
Kannan, Priya
Claydon, Leica Sarah
Publication Title: 
Issues in Mental Health Nursing

In the United States, the prevalence of depression is quite high-9% in the general population-with women, young adults, and seniors particularly vulnerable. In recent years, increasing numbers of people are turning to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for relief from depression and other mental health problems. One form of CAM, yoga, has been growing in popularity; this rise in popularity has, in part, been driven by interest in how this practice, with its mindfulness and meditation aspects, may decrease depression.

Author(s): 
Louie, Lila

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Young Adult