Holistic Health

Publication Title: 
Maryland Medical Journal (Baltimore, Md.: 1985)
Author(s): 
Siegel, B. S.
Publication Title: 
Orvosi Hetilap

In humans there is evidence that the restriction of total caloric intake appears to be more important than the restriction of any particular macronutrient. Today the mechanism of the effect of caloric restriction is unknown. With advancing age and the occurrence of concomitant illness there is an increased risk of developing nutritional deficiencies.

Author(s): 
Iv·n, L.
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

Catholic healthcare's mission is keeping people healthy, and providers must listen closely to determine their needs in these fast-paced, stressful times. In a society preoccupied with technology and acute care, which has the least overall impact on people's health, providers must implement more preventive strategies. The shift to promoting community health will require diverse, creative approaches. Catholic facilities must offer holistic healing, becoming community resources for children and the elderly.

Author(s): 
Ryan, M. J.
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

Recent research has demonstrated a clear link between spirituality and health, but it remains a challenge for many organizations to weave spirituality into organizational life and make it an integral component of clinical care. Three dimensions of spirituality work together in healthcare: spiritual well-being of patients and families, spiritual well-being of workers, and spiritual well-being of the organization. To cultivate these dimensions in the life of healthcare organizations, several strategies may be employed. First, the definition of "spirituality" must be clear.

Author(s): 
Craigie, F. C.
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

In 1988, with the publication of Catholic Health Ministry: A New Vision for a New Century, the Commission on Catholic Health Care Ministry called on the Church to redefine its healing mission in society. Unfortunately, despite various efforts, the Church has not yet fully articulated a shared vision of Catholic healthcare, healing, and support. Healing human brokenness has always been the Church's work in the world, whether the brokenness be physical, emotional, intellectual, moral, or spiritual.

Author(s): 
Fahey, C. J.
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

As responsibility for mission shifts from religious to lay leadership, sponsor-secular partnerships and new models of governance help to ensure that Catholic health care facilities continue the healing ministry of Jesus. By appointing lay mission directors and developing programs that support the work of health care professionals and associates "in the trenches," the sponsors of Catholic health care facilities are embedding particular values and behaviors in their organizations.

Author(s): 
Brother Edward Smink, null
Publication Title: 
Home Healthcare Nurse

Your patient is a Catholic, and you are not. How can you be sensitive to the patient's spiritual needs? How do Catholics think about health and illness? What kind of spiritual resources do they draw upon when facing a health crisis?

Author(s): 
Narayan, Mary Curry
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

The Catholic health care ministry is about mission, and the role of organizational ethical reflection is to encourage people in the ministry to think about the institutional performance and practice of medicine within a ministry of the Catholic Church. By engaging a creative process that identifies the needs of people served by Catholic health care, institutions are able to mediate the healing and redeeming power of Jesus, thereby creating virtuous organizations.

Author(s): 
Gallagher, John A.
Publication Title: 
Policy, Politics & Nursing Practice

Faith community nursing, formerly known as parish nursing, is one model of care that relies heavily on older registered nurses (RNs) to provide population-based and other nonclinical services in community settings. Faith community nursing provides services not commonly available in the traditional health care system (e.g., community case management, community advocacy, community health education).

Author(s): 
McGinnis, Sandra L.
Zoske, Frances M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Prevention & Intervention in the Community

In 1985, the Bishops' Committee on Priestly Life and Ministry recommended bishops form holistic health boards for their priests based on the results of a 1982 U.S. survey of Catholic priests. In 1995, a holistic health committee was formed under the office of the vicar for priests for the archdiocese of Chicago. One of the committee's first actions was to survey the priests of the archdiocese of Chicago to identify baseline health behaviors and needs.

Author(s): 
Koller, Michael
Blanchfield, Kathleen
Vavra, Tim
Andrusyk, Jara
Altier, Mary

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