Middle Aged

Publication Title: 
Western Journal of Nursing Research

Initiation and maintenance of physical activity (PA) in older adults is of increasing concern as the benefits of PA have been shown to improve physical functioning, mood, weight, and cardiovascular risk factors. Meditative movement forms of PA, such as tai chi and qigong (TC & QG), are holistic in nature and have increased in popularity over the past few decades. Several randomized controlled trials have evaluated TC & QG interventions from multiple perspectives, specifically targeting older adults.

Author(s): 
Rogers, Carol E.
Larkey, Linda K.
Keller, Colleen
Publication Title: 
Medical Care

BACKGROUND: Clinical trial evidence in controversial areas such as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) must be approached with an open mind. OBJECTIVE: To determine what factors may influence practitioners' interpretation of evidence from CAM trials. RESEARCH DESIGN: In a mailed survey of 2400 US CAM and conventional medicine practitioners we included 2 hypothetical factorial vignettes of positive and negative research results for CAM clinical trials. Vignettes contained randomly varied journal (Annals of Internal Medicine vs.

Author(s): 
Tilburt, Jon C.
Miller, Franklin G.
Jenkins, Sarah
Kaptchuk, Ted J.
Clarridge, Brian
Bolcic-Jankovic, Dragana
Emanuel, Ezekiel J.
Curlin, Farr A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health

INTRODUCTION: Despite questionable efficacy and safety, many women use a variety of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies to relieve menopause symptoms. METHODS: We examined the determinants and use of CAM therapies among a sample of menopausal-aged women in Canada by using a cross-sectional Web-based survey. RESULTS: Four hundred twenty-three women who were contacted through list serves, e-mail lists, and Internet advertisements provided complete data on demographics, use of CAM, therapies, and menopausal status and symptoms.

Author(s): 
Lunny, Carole A.
Fraser, Shawn N.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Community Health

The purpose of this study was to identify the perceptions of nurses toward the effectiveness and safety, as well as their recommendations for and personal use of complementary and alternative medical therapies. A, random sample of 1000 nurses throughout the United States were surveyed using a three-wave mailing. About half of the respondents perceived there was conclusive evidence or preponderance of evidence that five therapies were effective: biofeedback, chiropractic, meditation/relaxation, multi-vitamins, and massage therapy.

Author(s): 
Brolinson, P. G.
Price, J. H.
Ditmyer, M.
Reis, D.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Pharmacists Association: JAPhA

OBJECTIVE: To assess actions of community pharmacists in response to their patients' concurrent use of prescription medications and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). DESIGN: Nonexperimental, cross-sectional mail survey. SETTING: Texas. PARTICIPANTS: 107 community pharmacists. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pharmacists' self-reported rate of patient inquiry about CAM use and actions taken in response to CAM use.

Author(s): 
Brown, Carolyn M.
Barner, Jamie C.
Shah, Sonalee
Publication Title: 
The Medical Journal of Australia

When a prominent Australian politician, the then Premier of Tasmania, The Honourable Jim Bacon, publicly announced in February 2004 that he had lung cancer, he was inundated with well-wishing communications sent by post, email and other means. They included 157 items of correspondence recommending a wide variety of complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs). The most common CAMs recommended were meditation, Chinese medicine, "glyconutrients", juices, Laetrile and various diets and dietary supplements.

Author(s): 
Lowenthal, Ray M.
Publication Title: 
Medical Care

BACKGROUND: Clinical trial evidence in controversial areas such as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) must be approached with an open mind. OBJECTIVE: To determine what factors may influence practitioners' interpretation of evidence from CAM trials. RESEARCH DESIGN: In a mailed survey of 2400 US CAM and conventional medicine practitioners we included 2 hypothetical factorial vignettes of positive and negative research results for CAM clinical trials. Vignettes contained randomly varied journal (Annals of Internal Medicine vs.

Author(s): 
Tilburt, Jon C.
Miller, Franklin G.
Jenkins, Sarah
Kaptchuk, Ted J.
Clarridge, Brian
Bolcic-Jankovic, Dragana
Emanuel, Ezekiel J.
Curlin, Farr A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health

INTRODUCTION: Despite questionable efficacy and safety, many women use a variety of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies to relieve menopause symptoms. METHODS: We examined the determinants and use of CAM therapies among a sample of menopausal-aged women in Canada by using a cross-sectional Web-based survey. RESULTS: Four hundred twenty-three women who were contacted through list serves, e-mail lists, and Internet advertisements provided complete data on demographics, use of CAM, therapies, and menopausal status and symptoms.

Author(s): 
Lunny, Carole A.
Fraser, Shawn N.
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: A growing number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have investigated the therapeutic value of yoga interventions. This bibliometric analysis aimed to provide a comprehensive review of the characteristics of the totality of available randomized yoga trials. METHODS: All RCTs of yoga were eligible. Medline/PubMed, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, IndMED, and the tables of content of yoga specialty journals not listed in medical databases were screened through February 2014. Bibliometric data, data on participants, and intervention were extracted and analyzed descriptively.

Author(s): 
Cramer, Holger
Lauche, Romy
Dobos, Gustav
Publication Title: 
Journal of Human Hypertension

Some evidence from previous randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews has demonstrated a positive association between hypertension and transcendental meditation (TM). However, other trials and reviews showed the effect of TM on blood pressure (BP) was unclear but did not use subgroup analysis to rigorously investigate this relationship. The American Heart Association has stated that TM is potentially beneficial but did not give a standard indication. The present study explored several subgroup analyses in systematic reviews to investigate the effect of TM on BP.

Author(s): 
Bai, Z.
Chang, J.
Chen, C.
Li, P.
Yang, K.
Chi, I.

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