Mind-Body Relations, Metaphysical

Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

BACKGROUND: A comprehensive, but not systematic, review of the research on complementary and alternative treatments, specifically mind/body techniques, on musculoskeletal disease was conducted at Stanford University. The goals of the review were to establish a comprehensive literature review and provide a rationale for future research carrying the theme of "successful aging." METHODS: Computerized searches were conducted using MEDLINE, PsychInfo, Stanford Library, Dissertation Abstracts, Lexus-Nexus, the Internet as well as interviews conducted with practitioners and the elderly.

Author(s): 
Luskin, F. M.
Newell, K. A.
Griffith, M.
Holmes, M.
Telles, S.
DiNucci, E.
Marvasti, F. F.
Hill, M.
Pelletier, K. R.
Haskell, W. L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: Meditative techniques are sought frequently by patients coping with medical and psychological problems. Because of their increasingly widespread appeal and use, and the potential for use as medical therapies, a concise and thorough review of the current state of scientific knowledge of these practices as medical interventions was conducted. PURPOSE: To systematically review the evidence supporting efficacy and safety of meditative practices in treating illnesses, and examine areas warranting further study. Studies on normal healthy populations are not included.

Author(s): 
Arias, Albert J.
Steinberg, Karen
Banga, Alok
Trestman, Robert L.
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death and disability in the industrialized world, and its prevalence is rapidly increasing among developing nations. The increasing global prevalence of CVD reflects in part the concurrent rise in insulin resistance, obesity, dyslipidemia, and other atherogenic changes associated with insulin resistance syndrome (IRS). Evidence suggests that chronic stress and related psychosocial factors also play an important role in the development and progression of IRS-related states and ultimately, in the pathogenesis of CVD.

Author(s): 
Innes, Kim E.
Vincent, Heather K.
Taylor, Ann Gill
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Nursing & Midwifery

Complementary therapies are becoming increasingly popular in cultures dominated by biomedicine. Modalities are often extracted from various healing systems and cultural contexts and integrated into health care, expanding the focus from treatment of disease to the promotion of health. The cultural aspects of biomedicine are presented and compared and contrasted with other healing systems. Three healing systems; traditional Chinese medicine, Yoga, with roots in Ayurvedic medicine and Shamanic healing illustrate these fundamental differences in approaches to healing.

Author(s): 
Engebretson, Joan
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

BACKGROUND: A comprehensive, but not systematic, review of the research on complementary and alternative treatments, specifically mind/body techniques, on musculoskeletal disease was conducted at Stanford University. The goals of the review were to establish a comprehensive literature review and provide a rationale for future research carrying the theme of "successful aging." METHODS: Computerized searches were conducted using MEDLINE, PsychInfo, Stanford Library, Dissertation Abstracts, Lexus-Nexus, the Internet as well as interviews conducted with practitioners and the elderly.

Author(s): 
Luskin, F. M.
Newell, K. A.
Griffith, M.
Holmes, M.
Telles, S.
DiNucci, E.
Marvasti, F. F.
Hill, M.
Pelletier, K. R.
Haskell, W. L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: Meditative techniques are sought frequently by patients coping with medical and psychological problems. Because of their increasingly widespread appeal and use, and the potential for use as medical therapies, a concise and thorough review of the current state of scientific knowledge of these practices as medical interventions was conducted. PURPOSE: To systematically review the evidence supporting efficacy and safety of meditative practices in treating illnesses, and examine areas warranting further study. Studies on normal healthy populations are not included.

Author(s): 
Arias, Albert J.
Steinberg, Karen
Banga, Alok
Trestman, Robert L.
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

BACKGROUND: A comprehensive, but not systematic, review of the research on complementary and alternative treatments, specifically mind/body techniques, on musculoskeletal disease was conducted at Stanford University. The goals of the review were to establish a comprehensive literature review and provide a rationale for future research carrying the theme of "successful aging." METHODS: Computerized searches were conducted using MEDLINE, PsychInfo, Stanford Library, Dissertation Abstracts, Lexus-Nexus, the Internet as well as interviews conducted with practitioners and the elderly.

Author(s): 
Luskin, F. M.
Newell, K. A.
Griffith, M.
Holmes, M.
Telles, S.
DiNucci, E.
Marvasti, F. F.
Hill, M.
Pelletier, K. R.
Haskell, W. L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

Introducing holism and complementary medicine into mainstream medical education provides many scientific, philosophical, and personal challenges. The growth of new knowledge always necessitates venturing into areas, which are, by definition, unknown, hence arise potential clashes of ideology, knowledge, evidence, interpretation, language, and personality. This paper outlines some of the experience and progress made at Monash University Victoria, Australia, in teaching this material in undergraduate medical education.

Author(s): 
Hassed, Craig S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Advanced Nursing

AIM: This paper reports a systematic review and critical appraisal of the evidence on the effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction for cancer supportive care. BACKGROUND: The experience of cancer can have a negative impact on both psychological and physical health and on quality of life. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction is a therapy package that has been used with patients with a variety of conditions. In order to draw conclusions on its effectiveness for cancer patients, the evidence requires systematic assessment.

Author(s): 
Smith, Joanna E.
Richardson, Janet
Hoffman, Caroline
Pilkington, Karen
Publication Title: 
AAOHN journal: official journal of the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses

Mindfulness meditation (MfM) is a mind-body therapy identified by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Initially taught in a formal classroom setting, MfM is a sustainable intervention with minimal costs that can be used over time. For veterans, after mastery, this technique shows promise in improving health outcomes and quality of life. This article describes MfM, discusses the conceptual framework and evidence-based research for MfM, and identifies the implications of MfM use by health care providers who are caring for war veterans.

Author(s): 
Cuellar, Norma G.

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