Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Publication Title: 
Brain and Cognition

The most diffuse forms of meditation derive from Hinduism and Buddhism spiritual traditions. Different cognitive processes are set in place to reach these meditation states. According to an historical-philological hypothesis (Wynne, 2009) the two forms of meditation could be disentangled.

Author(s): 
Tomasino, Barbara
Chiesa, Alberto
Fabbro, Franco
Publication Title: 
BioMed Research International

Over the past decade mind and body practices, such as yoga and meditation, have raised interest in different scientific fields; in particular, the physiological mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects observed in meditators have been investigated. Neuroimaging studies have studied the effects of meditation on brain structure and function and findings have helped clarify the biological underpinnings of the positive effects of meditation practice and the possible integration of this technique in standard therapy.

Author(s): 
Boccia, Maddalena
Piccardi, Laura
Guariglia, Paola
Publication Title: 
Consciousness and Cognition

Meditation comprises a series of practices mainly developed in eastern cultures aiming at controlling emotions and enhancing attentional processes. Several authors proposed to divide meditation techniques in focused attention (FA) and open monitoring (OM) techniques. Previous studies have reported differences in brain networks underlying FA and OM. On the other hand common activations across different meditative practices have been reported.

Author(s): 
Sperduti, Marco
Martinelli, Penelope
Piolino, Pascale
Publication Title: 
Consciousness and Cognition

Meditation comprises a series of practices mainly developed in eastern cultures aiming at controlling emotions and enhancing attentional processes. Several authors proposed to divide meditation techniques in focused attention (FA) and open monitoring (OM) techniques. Previous studies have reported differences in brain networks underlying FA and OM. On the other hand common activations across different meditative practices have been reported.

Author(s): 
Sperduti, Marco
Martinelli, Penelope
Piolino, Pascale
Publication Title: 
BioMed Research International

Over the past decade mind and body practices, such as yoga and meditation, have raised interest in different scientific fields; in particular, the physiological mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects observed in meditators have been investigated. Neuroimaging studies have studied the effects of meditation on brain structure and function and findings have helped clarify the biological underpinnings of the positive effects of meditation practice and the possible integration of this technique in standard therapy.

Author(s): 
Boccia, Maddalena
Piccardi, Laura
Guariglia, Paola
Publication Title: 
L'Encephale

INTRODUCTION: Emotional reactivity and sleep constitute key dimensions of bipolar disorder. Emotional reactivity referred to emotion response intensity and emotion response threshold. Higher emotion reactivity is described during both mood episodes and periods of remission in bipolar disorder. As well, sleep disturbances are described during both acute episodes and euthymic periods in bipolar disorder. Links between sleep and emotion regulation start to be studied in general population.

Author(s): 
Boudebesse, Carole
Henry, Chantal
Publication Title: 
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors: Journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors

Adolescence is a unique developmental period characterized by major physiological, psychological, social, and brain changes, as well as an increased incidence of maladaptive, addictive behaviors. With the use of MRI techniques, researchers have been able to provide a better understanding of adolescent brain maturation and how neurodevelopment affects cognition and behavior. This review discusses adolescent brain development and its potential influence on psychotherapeutic change.

Author(s): 
Wetherill, Reagan
Tapert, Susan F.
Publication Title: 
Brain and Cognition

The most diffuse forms of meditation derive from Hinduism and Buddhism spiritual traditions. Different cognitive processes are set in place to reach these meditation states. According to an historical-philological hypothesis (Wynne, 2009) the two forms of meditation could be disentangled.

Author(s): 
Tomasino, Barbara
Chiesa, Alberto
Fabbro, Franco
Publication Title: 
CNS spectrums

This article reviews the theory, clinical application, and empirical findings on mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) for mental health and addictive disorders. Expanding upon the research demonstrating the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for addiction, this article develops and explores the rationale for combining mindfulness-based interventions with evidence-based CBTs in treating addictive disorders, with an emphasis on substance use disorders with co-occurring mood disorders.

Author(s): 
Hoppes, Kimberly
Publication Title: 
Journal of Affective Disorders

BACKGROUND: Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a prevalent anxiety disorder, but its neurobiological basis has been poorly studied. A few cognitive models have been proposed for understanding GAD development and maintenance. The aim of this study is to review functional Magnetic Resonance Image (fMRI) studies conducted with GAD patients and evaluate if they support and underpin the theoretical cognitive models proposed for this anxiety disorder. METHODS: A literature systematic review was undertaken in PubMed and ISI databases with no time limits.

Author(s): 
Mochcovitch, Marina Dyskant
da Rocha Freire, Rafael Christophe
Garcia, Rafael Ferreira
Nardi, Antonio E.

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