Aged

Publication Title: 
Western Journal of Nursing Research

Initiation and maintenance of physical activity (PA) in older adults is of increasing concern as the benefits of PA have been shown to improve physical functioning, mood, weight, and cardiovascular risk factors. Meditative movement forms of PA, such as tai chi and qigong (TC & QG), are holistic in nature and have increased in popularity over the past few decades. Several randomized controlled trials have evaluated TC & QG interventions from multiple perspectives, specifically targeting older adults.

Author(s): 
Rogers, Carol E.
Larkey, Linda K.
Keller, Colleen
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Sleep disorders are one of the most common difficulties facing older people. Meditative movement interventions (MMIs), a new category of exercise integrating physical activity and meditation (e.g., t'ai chi, yoga, and qigong), may benefit older people with sleep problems. This systematic review synthesized the evidence on the effect of MMIs on older people's quality of sleep.

Author(s): 
Wu, Wei-Wei
Kwong, Enid
Lan, Xiu-Yan
Jiang, Xiao-Ying
Publication Title: 
Brain, Behavior, and Immunity

Physical activity (PA) is emerging as a safe and effective tool in the prevention and treatment of psychiatric disorders. PA subtypes include aerobic, resistance, flexibility, neuromotor (involving balance, agility and co-ordination), mind-body (e.g. tai chi, qi gong and yoga) and mixed type trainings. Evidence from clinical trials suggests that PA subtypes can have positive clinical effects, however the effects on the symptomatology may vary according to the PA subtype.

Author(s): 
Eyre, Harris A.
Baune, Bernhard T.
Publication Title: 
Manual Therapy

BACKGROUND: Neck pain (NP) is disabling and costly. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of exercise on pain, disability, function, patient satisfaction, quality of life (QoL) and global perceived effect (GPE) in adults with NP. METHODS: We searched computerised databases up to May 2014 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing exercise to a control in adults with NP with/without cervicogenic headache (CGH) or radiculopathy. Two reviewers independently conducted selection, data abstraction and assessed risk of bias.

Author(s): 
Gross, A. R.
Paquin, J. P.
Dupont, G.
Blanchette, S.
Lalonde, P.
Cristie, T.
Graham, N.
Kay, T. M.
Burnie, S. J.
Gelley, G.
Goldsmith, C. H.
Forget, M.
Santaguida, P. L.
Yee, A. J.
Radisic, G. G.
Hoving, J. L.
Bronfort, G.
Cervical Overview Group
Publication Title: 
Pain Medicine (Malden, Mass.)

STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a structured review of eight mind-body interventions for older adults with chronic nonmalignant pain. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and evidence for pain reduction in older adults with chronic nonmalignant pain in the following mind-body therapies: biofeedback, progressive muscle relaxation, meditation, guided imagery, hypnosis, tai chi, qi gong, and yoga. METHODS: Relevant studies in the MEDLINE, PsycINFO, AMED, and CINAHL databases were located. A manual search of references from retrieved articles was also conducted.

Author(s): 
Morone, Natalia E.
Greco, Carol M.
Publication Title: 
Current Rheumatology Reviews

The objective of this umbrella systematic review was to identify, evaluate, and synthesize systematic reviews of physical activity interventions for adults with fibromyalgia (FM) focussing on four outcomes: pain, multidimensional function (wellness or quality of life), physical function (self-reported physical function or measured physical fitness) and adverse effects. A further objective was to link these outcomes with details of the interventions so as to guide and shape future practice and research.

Author(s): 
Bidonde, Julia
Busch, Angela Jean
Bath, Brenna
Milosavljevic, Stephan
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: In older adults, diminished balance is associated with reduced physical functioning and an increased risk of falling. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2007. OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects of exercise interventions on balance in older people, aged 60 and over, living in the community or in institutional care. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 1), MEDLINE and EMBASE (to February 2011).

Author(s): 
Howe, Tracey E.
Rochester, Lynn
Neil, Fiona
Skelton, Dawn A.
Ballinger, Claire
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Chinese Medicine

A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of qigong as a treatment for chronic pain. Five electronic databases were searched from their date of establishment until July 2014. The review included 10 randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that compared the impacts of qigong on chronic pain with waiting list or placebo or general care. Random effect models and standard mean differences were used to present pain scores. A total of 10 RCTs met inclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
Bai, Zhenggang
Guan, Zhen
Fan, Yuan
Liu, Chuan
Yang, Kehu
Ma, Bin
Wu, Bei
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

BACKGROUND: Qigong and Tai Chi are the two most popular traditional Chinese exercises, known as mind-body movement therapies. Previous studies suggest that Qigong and Tai Chi may be beneficial in reducing depressive symptoms. This was the first study to systematically review and compare the effects of Qigong and Tai Chi on depressive symptoms. METHODS: A systematic search of six electronic databases was undertaken through to February 2014, for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) which reported depressive symptoms measured by a depressive symptom rating scale.

Author(s): 
Liu, Xin
Clark, Justin
Siskind, Dan
Williams, Gail M.
Byrne, Gerard
Yang, Jiao L.
Doi, Suhail A.
Publication Title: 
Family Practice

BACKGROUND: Complementary medicine is increasingly popular with patients and with GPs, although it still remains mainly in the private sector. Few data are available from the private sector about patient-consulting patterns and outcome. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to describe detailed consulting patterns, help-seeking behaviour and outcome of care for patients attending a group of private complementary practitioners in a single general practice surgery.

Author(s): 
Paterson, C.

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